Halloween & Safety Training

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Halloween stores pop up all over the country and many stores temporarily dedicate multiple aisles to halloween decorations, candy and costumes. Many of these items can be great props for use in safety training classes and activities. For some ideas on how to take advantage of Halloween sales (especially in the days following October 31st), check out our FREE Halloween and Safety Training guide!   Happy Halloween!

For our full guide on Halloween and Safety Training, Click Here.

 

Diversity and Training Images

noun_professor_2909357.pngIt’s important to try to use images in your safety training that reflect a diverse population. Specific images related to safety can be hard to find in the first place but trying to find safety images that reflect diversity can be almost impossible. The Noun project (a great source for icons for your training materials) has a new set of icons that show women in leadership and STEM positions. I applaud their efforts! If you want to check out or download the icons, see the link below.
 

An Apple a Day

IMG_6581I just read it’s #NationalAppleDay! I remember a Bible school teacher cutting an apple in half as part of a lesson and I remember learning about an apple falling on Newton’s head which led him to come up with the law of gravity – in both cases an image or prop really helped with what someone was trying to teach me since I still remember it many years later. Always try to think how you can create a mental image to share with your trainees when trying to get a concept or new idea across. Do you have any other “apple” ideas to share?

Check out this and other posts, plus other safety training resources at https://safetyfundamentals.com/blogs/news

The Feynman Technique

Have you heard of the Feynman Technique? If you want to learn something – really learn something – the 4 steps proposed by Richard Feynman, a Nobel prize winning physicist, can help. The 4 basics steps of the Feynman Technique are shown below but in a nutshell, they are: 1) Pick a concept and write it out as if you were explaining it to a child (no big, hairy technical words or jargon); 2) identify areas where you had trouble explaining the concept. This is where there are gaps in your knowledge. Go back and find the information you need and study it so that you can now explain that information to an 8 year old; 3) organize your notes and organize them into a story that is again, simple and easy to understand. If there are still confusing parts, go back and rewrite your summary story; 4) Tell someone else about it. A good way to see if you really understand something is to try to explain it to someone else.  (We can use this last step in safety training – more on that in tomorrow’s post).  Take a look at the infographic below which summarizes a description of the Feynman technique that was originally posted on the Farnham Street blog.  What do you want to learn next? Can you try the Feynman Technique and see if it works?

feynman infographic.png

Fire Prevention Month

Fire Prevention Week just ended but many safety and health professionals pay extra attention to fire prevention for the whole month of October. A put together a collection of fire safety training activities that I sell on my website but for a limited time, I am offering a free download of this ebook in honor of fire safety month. If you have not taken advantage of this offer yet, click here to get your free download.  (I’m taking it down at the end of this week).

five for fire 3d copyIf you use any of the activities, I’d love to hear how your trainees like them. I’m always looking for your feedback and ideas for creating future activities.  Thanks and Happy Training!

 

Flash Roles

I just finished “Flip the Script” by Oren Klaff, a very rich guy who runs around the world making huge million dollar deals. Why would a safety professional read this? The subtitle pulled me in. flip the script.png“Getting People to think Your Idea is Their Idea” is something that many safety people need to do every day in order to be successful in their jobs. I love to combine ideas from other fields and apply them to safety and this book has some good advice for pitching ideas to the people we work with either occasionally or every day.

One of the ideas I am most intrigued by is the concept of a “flash role.” In the book, the author talks about the scene from My Cousin Vinny where a star witness spouts off a paragraph of deep knowledge about cars, very quickly and matter of factly, in order to gain acceptance as an automotive expert.  Click here to see the video.

Would this work for safety pros out in the field? I tend to think it would (as long as you really do know what you are talking about). Especially female or younger safety pros may have to show they know their stuff before being taken seriously.  If you want others to go along with your ideas (even for something as simple as a “request” to wear fall protection), getting them to accept you as an expert is very important.  If you are a safety pro who came into OHS from the field, this is probably something you already love to do.  Workers may mistakenly underestimate you not realizing you have been in their shoes and know the lingo, the short-cuts, and the work-arounds. A quick flash role will likely elevate your status.

Have you tried something similar to a flash role? If so, what was the topic where you needed to show your expertise quickly and matter-of-factly? How did you do it? (I’ll try to collect some examples and post them here) but feel free to share your “flash roles” in the comments.

Slide Backgrounds From Your iPhone

I attended a great meeting of the Association for Talent Development (ATD) NYC’s chapter last night where we learned how to use our phones to take images that could be used in elearning. I personally don’t do much with elearning but everything I learned can be applied to classroom learning as well. During the class, we learned the basics of good composition and tricks for editing on our phones as well as in PowerPoint. During the class we had the chance to practice and I continued practicing on my way to the train home. The following is what I was able to capture in just about 30 minutes. I am looking forward to taking more photos and manipulating them so that I can have some awesome images in my presentation materials. I often talk about image-based safety so you know how important I think the right images are in safety training. I hope these photos get your creative juices flowing too!

Check out the samples here.

slide backgrounds