Decisions, Decisions

Your legacy is built one decision at a time.-2

 

One of my favorite sayings, and the title of one of my favorite books, is “Die Empty” (written by Todd Henry). (I have even had a bracelet made with this saying to remind me of my desire to “die empty” when it’s my time). This post isn’t about dying but about this quote from the book  – “Your Legacy is Built One Decision at a Time.” These decisions, which determine our legacy, are made by safety professionals everyday.

You walk by a guy teetering on the top of a metal ladder, in front of a closed door, holding a drill and oh wait  – it’s starting to rain – Do you say something?  Or do you walk on by?

You are riding a bus or train with co-workers and someone starts to berate someone in your group of the opposite sex or of a different religion or political viewpoint than that of the rest of the group. Do you step in or step away?

You are the passenger in an Uber or Lyft and the driver is texting while driving while trying to follow the GPS and get through traffic. Do you say something or keep quiet?

In some of these situations only you will know what decision you made and in others, your actions will be very public. You may think no one notices but every decision will form your legacy. Will people remember you as a safety professional who truly cares about others or someone who “practices” safety only when it’s convenient?

What decisions will you make today that will be your legacy?

 

 

 

Chunk-It

chunking.png
One way athletes are often taught to learn a new skill is by breaking it down into small chunks and then perfecting each of these steps.  In The Little Book of Talent, Daniel Coyle writes “Chunks are to skill what letters of the alphabet are to language. Alone, each is nearly useless, but when combined into bigger chunks (words), and … combined into still bigger things (sentences, paragraphs), they can build something complex and beautiful.”

Chunking is one way to help trainees to remember more. (See my earlier post on “Reducing” for more). If you are training a class how to do something, think about how you could break down (chunk) each part of the act and focus on each step separately. Let’s take an easy example – how to use a fire extinguisher (from OSHA’s website)

The first step shown is to select the appropriate screenshot_513.png

To chunk down this instruction, you could concentrate on the 4 steps listed as separate training “chunks.”

Pull the Pin – Can you set up a situation where trainees get to actually break the tamper seal and pull the pin? Is there anything else you assume they should know – or anything that you believe to be “common sense” but might need special reinforcement?

Aim – Can you do a demonstration that shows what happens when you aim at the base and when you aim elsewhere?  Can the trainees practice? How far away should you stand? What is a realistic situation for a workplace fire in your facility? It most certainly won’t look like the bonfire shown in the OSHA image. Will it be in a trashcan? If so, how do you aim at the base if you can’t see the base? When should a trainee attempt to put the fire out with the extinguisher and  when should they leave the area? (that question gives me an idea for a new training activity  – let me know if you want to see what I come up with). Think how you can break this step down to make the training as specific, realistic and applicable to the trainees’ work environment as possible.

Squeeze  – How hard does the handle need to be squeezed? How long? What if someone doesn’t have great hand strength? Do you need to squeeze fast or slow? Do you fingers go on top or bottom of the handle? What happens with it begins discharging? Is it easier or more difficult to squeeze the handle? What if they are wearing gloves? Is it more difficult? Can you have the trainees practice?

Sweep – How long and how fast do you sweep from side to side? How long will the extinguisher last? How will you know how long it will last before you use it? What should you do if the extinguisher runs out before the fire is out?  If the fire appears out, how long do you need to watch it? Should you throw water on it or do anything else after the fire is gone?

Do you get the idea? Each step in a relatively simple set of instructions can be broken down into a mini-topic. If you can’t see trainees face-to-face on consecutive days or weeks to cover each mini-topic (while referencing what was previous learned) maybe you could send out for emails or text messages with each focusing on one of the steps.

Four simple steps might seem just like four simple steps but as you can see by the random questions each step generated above, there could be a lot of questions zooming around your trainees head. If you don’t talk about actual fire possibilities in your workplace and specific conditions and challenges that might come with those fires, the training information will not stick so with every chunk you are able to create, make sure to integrate the real-world information your trainees need to know.